Report attributed to SMA prohibiting USAWTFM not true, says spokesman

Sgt. Maj. of the Army Daniel Dailey, seen here in an undated photo. Dailey's spokesman debunked a recent message claiming Dailey banned the Army from engaging with the popular Facebook page U. S. Army WTF Moments!
Sgt. Maj. of the Army Daniel Dailey, seen here in an undated photo. Dailey’s spokesman debunked a recent message claiming Dailey banned the Army from engaging with the popular Facebook page U.S. Army WTF Moments!

A widely-circulated message working its way through orderly rooms and first sergeant e-mail chains from Sgt. Maj. of the Army Daniel Dailey, seemingly banning the practice of liking, commenting, or posting on U.S. Army WTF Moments content is false, according to his representatives.

Master Sgt. Michael J. Carden, Dailey’s spokesman, told USAWTFM that “(Dailey) did not say that action will be taken against Soldiers for participating in USAWTFM. Misconduct by Soldiers on USAWTFM, or any online or offline forum, however, is subject to UCMJ.”

The message also came to USAWTFM from an anonymous fan, who wrote “…big Army says they’ll begin UCMJ action towards any active, reserve, or guard personnel contributing to, liking, or sharing your content. Regulations will supposedly be in place within 2 months. That’s from SMA Daniel Daily’s mouth, during a meeting with SFC and higher enlisted at Ft Bliss just over a week ago.”

Messages and warnings like this have been swirling for months, but have picked up in frequency after the revelation that active duty Marines were sharing nude photos of fellow Marines through a Facebook group. The group, “Marines United,” has since been banned from Facebook but has made a number of appearances on other social media platforms.

Army leadership has been focusing tighter on improper online conduct in the wake of the Marines United scandal, starting with the release of a so-called “tri-signed letter” from acting Army secretary Robert Speer, Army chief of staff Gen. Mark Milley, and Dailey, directing commanders to “reinforce a positive command climate free of misconduct or the appearance of condoning misconduct.”

While there are rumors of an impending policy change covering online misconduct, Carden, Dailey’s spokesman, would not confirm them or any pending release date

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